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Review of No Way This Time from Love In Reverse

Love in Reverse has released their first recording in over 20 years with their new single “No Way This Time”. Signaling what the band calls the “beginning of their next phase” this song is destined to become one of your favorites in the LIR catalogue. With catchy hooks, intelligent introspective lyrics, rock-solid drumming, awesome guitar riffs, and some soul satisfying synth, Love in Reverse pick up right where they left off more than twenty years ago.

For those of you not familiar with Love in Reverse, they were the newest (re)incarnation of the band Dog. They blasted onto the scene with music that reflected the 90s alternative sound but with their own unique futuristic twist. Imagine if early Soundgarden melded with Smashing Pumpkins and borrowed Radiohead’s equipment to travel into the far off future to battle alien invaders. But apparently the burden of knowing how much pop culture in the future would suck took its toll. After a trio of albums singer/guitarist Michael Ferentino, drummer Dave Halpern, and bassist Andres Karu went their separate ways. The new single features all three original members sounding like they never left us. If only all bands could sound this good 20 years after breaking up, the universe would truly be a better place.

Hello everyone. Please allow me to introduce the first brand new Love in Reverse recording and video in over 20 years. Right here and now. "No Way This Time" marks the beginning of our next phase. Single will be released worldwide to most streaming and download joints on 8/2/19. Full album TBA. Have a fantastic day!

Posted by Michael Ferentino on Friday, July 12, 2019

Review of 0x001 from Coarses

‘0x001’ is the 2016 release from Coarses. It’s a collection of ambient tracks that work just as well as stand alone pieces as they do as a whole. I stumbled upon this collection of drone goodness after seeing the trailer for the amazing short film ‘The Pond’ (link below). This is excellent music for writers of horror, thrillers, or any sort of dark fiction.

‘Open Field’ puts you in a trance right away with what sounds like the breathing of some fantastic machine. From the sound of it, its most likely a machine that eats people.

‘Worship’ creates an unsettling atmosphere, like you’ve just happened upon some ancient druidic ritual. Never a good thing.

‘Focus’ changes this up a bit with its catchy techno beat, and ‘Focus on Hands’ is the album’s best track. The finale is machine-like, bringing to mind The Terminator in his relentless quest to kill his intended target.

If you’re a fan of drone and ambient, this is definitely for you, and if you’re a fan of horror soundtracks, you should definitely check this out.

The Pond from Dane Elcar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlMRLmVRhcU

 

https://alteredtapedstates.bandcamp.com/album/0x001

 

Track Listing:

A1 Open Field

A2 Worship

B1 Focus

B2 Focus on Hands

Review of High Plaine from Ghost Box Orchestra

A ghost box, or Frank’s box, is a device used for contacting spirits through different radio frequencies. Some claim these devices should not be taken lightly, or abused, as there can be severe consequences. Others claim its all a bunch of superstitious nonsense. Either way, the ghost box has been the subject of great interest to those interested in contacting the spirit world. Doubtless its only a matter of time before Hollywood seizes upon this concept and creates an entire movie franchise around it. But for fans of music, Ghost Box Orchestra is something else entirely.

If you’re looking to “revisit” the 90s with new music, this is your chance! Ghost Box Orchestra is a band out of Boston that brings back the echo drenched neo-psychedelic 90s with a heart-warming vengeance. Sounding like The Verve back in their A Storm in Heaven days with a bit of Shoegaze thrown in for good measure, this album is definitely the type of music made for those who love music. And it contains enough reverb to kill a small elephant.

The album starts strong with “Flutter” and continues with the psychedelic guitars of the title track. Some high points include “Wave Goodbye”, with its slow plodding drums and sinister vocals sounding like some sort of death march. “Dead & Gone” conjures up memories of Stabbing Westward at their most menacing. Its heavy groove will make you want to smear the blood of your enemies on yourself after you’ve slain them. (editor’s note: this is not recommended as law enforcement usually frowns on such actions)

The last track, “Casualty Devotional” is the album’s masterpiece. It showers you in shimmery vocals while endless echoes of synthesizers and guitars fill the space around like an oncoming tide. Like a good story with a third act that pays off all the setups, this is the track that the entire album has been leading up to. And like a good story, you will not be disappointed, with the ending. After listening to this album, you will truly believe that you’ve been communicating with the spirit world, and from the sound of it, the Other Side is in good hands.

Track Listing

1 Flutter

2 High Plaine

3 Socrates Burned.

4 Wave Goodbye

5 Dead & Gone

6 Days Are Forever

7 Within the Sound

8 Casualty Devotional

https://ghostboxorchestra.bandcamp.com

 

Review of Big Sleep Little Death from Bedtime For Robots by Leo Zaccari

Big Sleep Little Death is the latest release from the purveyors of dark electronic music, Bedtime for Robots. This ambitious release comes on the heels of the enigmatic Music From an Undisclosed Location.

The album opens with the sprawling and spaced out electronic horror track “All My Idols Are Dead”. Given the pedigree of disparate musical acts that make up the brain trust behind Bedtime for Robots, this list of idols is undeniably quite impressive. The description on Bandcamp states that this album was inspired by horror and sci-fi films. The album does not disappoint, as one can easily hear certain tracks dropped into scenes of stalking or dismemberment (and who among us doesn’t love a good dismemberment?) But one can also hear glimpses of Junkie XL or The Crystal Method, and even The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, especially in tracks such as “National Lobotomy”.

The album features two centerpieces: the first is the title cut, which features dark electronica that is so sinister it sounds like it belong right at home in a William Friedkin film. The second is the final cut, entitled “Easter”, a bleak post apocalyptic sci-fi soundtrack that will make you think of all the possibilities and could have beens that the world once held while you’re staring at the mutated corpses rising from the wreckage of what was once your favorite record store.

Bedtime for Robots is the brainchild of Michael Ferentino. He was a musician once. You don’t want to know what he’s become now.

 

 

https://bedtimeforrobots.bandcamp.com/album/big-sleep-little-death

The End of the World – Review of Solaris from Antwan Graftio by Leo Zaccari

Antwan Graftio’s Solaris is an album filled with mythological themes and all the dark world ending horrors that come with them. The tracks themselves stand on their own, but when put together they are as pieces of a puzzle that create an amazing tapestry of a story. It is a story repeated in all the ancient cultures of the world, from ancient Chinese folk mythology to the Hindu cultures, to the Babylonians, Egyptians, Olmec, Greek, and Norse mythologies. All cultures used their mythology to make sense of the universe around them, and this album is like its own mythology in miniature.

“Cosmic History of the Earthly World” – works in tribal like percussion to give it a world music vibe with an electro synth cyberpunk feel. “On the Eve of the World Apocalypse” continues the mythological tone of a world in transition from one age to the next.

In ancient mythologies this was called Eschatology, the study of the end of the world. The world ends in a flood mostly because most of the oldest civilizations lived in close proximity to large bodies of water, such as Egypt being on the Nile, Mesopotamia being near the conjunction of the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers, and China being near the Yellow and the Yanxte rivers. But in other ancient civilizations, such as the Inca, there are many worlds, or ages, and they end in many different ways, including floods.

“Dead Tree” is another track that continues the mythological symbolism. From the ancient Maya and Inca to the Scandinavian Norse, the world tree is one of the oldest world myths and it is rife with symbolism. The roots that extend into the ground but also the branches that extend outward are meant to symbolize the different but parallel dimensions of this world and the spirit world. If the tree is dead, do the souls of those who have died travel on to the next plane of existence, or are they stuck here to haunt us forever?

“Last Train Cold Winter” is the album’s coldest darkest point, the point at which the old world must be destroyed before it can rise again anew. In both Norse and Mayan mythologies, the apocalypse is preceded by a dark era of lost morals where people lose their humanity. In Norse mythology this is known as Fimbulwinter, and is doubtless the source of inspiration for George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series. “Coming Home From Deep Space” has a clockwork feeling to it as well as a more subdued tone. Electronic music lovers might recall the early works of Jean Michele Jarre or Vangelis.

Graftio has constructed an album fitting of a world at the end of an age. An age of Apocalypse is followed by the promise of a new dawn, which brings with it, another album of awesome music.

 

 

https://graftio.bandcamp.com/album/album-solaris-2015