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Review of Big Sleep Little Death from Bedtime For Robots by Leo Zaccari

Big Sleep Little Death is the latest release from the purveyors of dark electronic music, Bedtime for Robots. This ambitious release comes on the heels of the enigmatic Music From an Undisclosed Location.

The album opens with the sprawling and spaced out electronic horror track “All My Idols Are Dead”. Given the pedigree of disparate musical acts that make up the brain trust behind Bedtime for Robots, this list of idols is undeniably quite impressive. The description on Bandcamp states that this album was inspired by horror and sci-fi films. The album does not disappoint, as one can easily hear certain tracks dropped into scenes of stalking or dismemberment (and who among us doesn’t love a good dismemberment?) But one can also hear glimpses of Junkie XL or The Crystal Method, and even The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, especially in tracks such as “National Lobotomy”.

The album features two centerpieces: the first is the title cut, which features dark electronica that is so sinister it sounds like it belong right at home in a William Friedkin film. The second is the final cut, entitled “Easter”, a bleak post apocalyptic sci-fi soundtrack that will make you think of all the possibilities and could have beens that the world once held while you’re staring at the mutated corpses rising from the wreckage of what was once your favorite record store.

Bedtime for Robots is the brainchild of Michael Ferentino. He was a musician once. You don’t want to know what he’s become now.

 

 

https://bedtimeforrobots.bandcamp.com/album/big-sleep-little-death

Review of Papilionidae from Dawn Tuesday by Leo Zaccari

Remember that evil spirit in the J Horror film The Grudge? Dawn Tuesday’s latest track, Papilionidae, is that same malevolent force in song form. It’s a creeping, unrelenting, horror spectacle that destroys anything in its path and cannot be controlled. Papilionidae is split into two tracks, the first clocking in at twenty minutes, the second at a mere seventeen minutes and six seconds.

The term Papilionidae is the term for the family of butterflies that include, but are not limited to, the Swallowtail butterfly. In choosing this title, Dawn Tuesday might be alluding to some sort of metamorphosis, perhaps suggesting that the listener will undergo some transmutation into some altered form of consciousness. Or perhaps it’s suggesting that it is the transformation into a higher conscious realm that she traveled to receive inspiration for her music?

Papilionidae isn’t just spine tingling horror that belongs in a horror movie – it is a complete cinematic experience all by itself. It needs no visuals because the listener will create their own with the help of this eerie, supernatural music. “Part One” conjures up images of bodies everywhere, blood spattered walls and a killer on the loose. Without words it speaks of horrors too ghastly to imagine and too terrible to speak of.

“Part Two” is more paranormal like the soundtrack of a coven of witches as they commune for a midnight summoning of some otherworldly demonic creature that will carry out their malevolent bidding. Missing children, mutilated cattle, crop circles, foreboding storm clouds, shadows moving across the land all come to mind when listening to this mystical and menacing track that wasn’t so much recorded as it was summoned into existence. Most likely the writing and recording of this otherworldly delicacy involved a ritual killing of some kind. But we best not speak of that.

Pay a visit to Dawn Tuesday’s Bandcamp page, purchase these tracks and immerse yourself in some of the best horror music you will ever find anywhere, in this realm, or in any other. But whatever format you choose to listen to these magnificent beasts, whether on your smartphone, or your computer, be sure to draw a circle around it or use some other religious or traditional folk remedy to ward off any evil that might have come with it.

Just in case.

 

https://dawntuesday.bandcamp.com/album/papilionidae